Call for Abstract

2nd Global Optometrist Meeting and Trade Fair on Laser Technology, will be organized around the theme “Emerging new trends with advances in Laser Technology”

Laser Tech 2016 is comprised of 20 tracks and 181 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Laser Tech 2016.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

  • Track 1-1Free Electron Lasers
  • Track 1-2Quantum Cascade Lasers
  • Track 1-3X-ray Lasers
  • Track 1-4Solid State Lasers
  • Track 1-5Ceramic lasers
  • Track 1-6Femtosecond Lasers
  • Track 1-7Femtosecond Lasers and its applications
  • Track 1-8Microchip Lasers
  • Track 1-9High-energy Lasers
  • Track 1-10Disporsable Film Lasers

Optometry is a healthcare profession concerned with the eyes and related structures, as well as vision, visual systems, and vision information processing in humans. Optometrists are trained to prescribe and fit lenses to improve vision, and in some countries are trained to diagnose and treat various eye diseases. Research in Optometry includes investigations in areas such as binocular disorders, low vision, ocular disease, geriatrics, pediatrics, and the effects of contact lens wear.

The Optometrists industry has exhibited growth over the past five years, thanks to robust demand from the burgeoning elderly population, which has caused optometry services to expand.

  • Track 2-1Eyecare Optometry
  • Track 2-2Clinical Optometry
  • Track 2-3Developmental Optometry
  • Track 2-4Recent advances in Optometry
  • Track 2-5Research Trends in Surgical and Medical Ophthalmology
  • Track 2-6Cornea and Corneal Diseases
  • Track 2-7Ocular Diseases & Therapeutics

Optometrists does the Optometry practice. Optometry practice includes investigations in areas such as binocular disorders, low vision, ocular disease, geriatrics, pediatrics, and the effects of contact lens wear.

Optometry practice is a steadily evolving field with the goal of improving global eye health. There are several new techniques and procedures that are gaining in popularity and may well become future standards in eye care.

  • Track 3-1Advances in Optometry Practice
  • Track 3-2Optometrists Insights
  • Track 3-3Ophthalmology Surgery
  • Track 3-4Ophthalmology Novel Approaches

Optometrists and ophthalmologists use a wide variety of tests and procedures to the eyes. These tests range from simple ones, like reading an eye chart, to complex tests, such as using a high-powered lens to visualize the tiny structures inside of the eyes. Eye care technology is a steadily evolving field with the goal of improving global eye health. There are several new techniques and procedures that are gaining in popularity and may well become future standards in eye care. This technology is still relatively new, so not all surgeons have access to these methods.

  • Track 4-1Eye Care Research
  • Track 4-2The Draize eye Test
  • Track 4-3Advances in Color Blindness Test
  • Track 4-4Advances in Laser retina Scanning
  • Track 4-5Cataract and refractive Surgery
  • Track 4-6Protective Eye Care and New Advancements

Pediatric optometry is the branch of medicine that deals with the examination, diagnosis and treatment of children's eyes. Pediatric optometrists are specially trained to treat visual disorders in children. Companies like Allergan, Pfizer, Bausch + Lomb, Merck & Co. and Regeneron are actively participated in ophthalmic research and drug development. According to visiongain (Ophthalmic Drugs: World Market Prospects - 2013-2023; October 2013), the worldwide ophthalmic market was $17.5 billion in 2011 and is expected to grow to $34.7 billion by 2023, representing a 5.9% compounded annual growth rate.

  • Track 5-1Pediatric Eyecare
  • Track 5-2Pediatric Optometrists Insights
  • Track 5-3Pediatric Ophthalmologists Insights

Lasers optics events are well established in many manufacturing technologies, for precision delivery of intense power for scribing, cutting welding, and for precise 2D and 3D metrology. The many thousands of less powerful - but precise - lasers cutting fabrics, making patterns in glass blocks, customizing trophies and so on, really show how the laser has moved from technical marvel to common tool. Lasers in hospitals, dermatological suites, dental surgeries and eye clinics benefit many, day in, day out. Estimates suggest that the world market for lasers in 2007 alone was worth more than £4Bn!. The total number of laser patents issued since its invention is well over 50,000. There are more than 75 institutes across the world doing research in the advances of Laser Technology.

  • Track 6-1Laser Physics
  • Track 6-2Ultrashort Laser Pulses
  • Track 6-3Ultra short laser pulse generation
  • Track 6-4Raman spectroscopy and Laser spectroscopy
  • Track 6-5Ultrafast Laser Physics
  • Track 6-6Laser Production Technology
  • Track 6-7Laser Beam Shaping for Materials Processing
  • Track 6-8Laser Beam Technology
  • Track 6-9Laser-based processing
  • Track 6-10Laser-matter interactions
  • Track 6-11Laser based spectroscopic analysis
  • Track 6-12Laser Plasma Dynamics and Particle Accelaration
  • Track 6-13Innovative Laser Technology
  • Track 6-14Laser control of ion channels
  • Track 6-15Laser Marking Technology
  • Track 6-16Laser Scanning Technology
  • Track 6-173D Laser Scanning Technology

There can be no question that in the 50 years since its invention, the laser has driven scientific and technological innovation into virtually every facet of modern life. From surgery to communications, from medical diagnostics to printing, from metal-cutting to retail management, the laser has proven an essential and transformational tool. Scientists and engineers continue to find new uses for the laser every day. Some wide-reaching areas on the horizon for laser technology include improved cancer diagnoses, faster Internet speeds, and clean sources of energy, black hole exploration and much more.

Lasers optics events are well established in many manufacturing technologies, for precision delivery of intense power for scribing, cutting welding, and for precise 2D and 3D metrology. The many thousands of less powerful - but precise - lasers cutting fabrics, making patterns in glass blocks, customizing trophies and so on, really show how the laser has moved from technical marvel to common tool. Lasers in hospitals, dermatological suites, dental surgeries and eye clinics benefit many, day in, day out. Estimates suggest that the world market for lasers in 2007 alone was worth more than £4Bn!. The total number of laser patents issued since its invention is well over 50,000. There are more than 75 institutes across the world doing research in the advances of Laser Technology.

  • Track 7-1Laser system technology
  • Track 7-2Laser Engineering
  • Track 7-3Laser ablation
  • Track 7-4Laser Doping
  • Track 7-5Applications of Laser Doping
  • Track 7-6Laser Crystals (LC)
  • Track 7-7Laser Microfusion
  • Track 7-8Laser Communications
  • Track 7-9Laser matter interactions
  • Track 7-10Laser-based manipulation of cells
  • Track 7-11Advanced laser engravers
  • Track 7-12Ultrafast MIR Laser systems
  • Track 7-13Laser cooling and trapping of atoms
  • Track 7-14Laser produced plasma
  • Track 7-15Interaction of laser with plasma field
  • Track 7-16Laser-Plasma Spectroscopy
  • Track 7-17Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions
  • Track 7-18 Characterization of Laser-Produced Plasma (LPP)
  • Track 7-19Pulsed laser deposition
  • Track 7-20Laser Based Production process
  • Track 7-21Laser Beam Characterization
  • Track 7-22Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy
  • Track 7-23Laser Fabrication of Sensors and Detectors
  • Track 7-24Advances in Laser Material Processing
  • Track 7-25Lasers in Atomic/Molecular Cooling
  • Track 7-26Lasers and Non-Ionizing Radiation
  • Track 7-27Laser developement for spectroscopic applications
  • Track 7-28Advances in Laser Technology for photocoagulation
  • Track 7-29Atomic and molecular dynamics in intense laser fields

A laser sensor emits a beam of light from its transmitter. A reflective type photoelectric sensor is used to detect the light beam reflected from the target and the thrubeam type is used to measure the change in light quantity caused by the target crossing the beam. Laser sensors can detect, count, trigger, map, profile, scan, and guide as well as verify levels, proximities and distances. Laser sensors are ideal for many specific applications in Plant Management and Automation, Security and Surveillance, Vehicle Guidance and Automation and Traffic Management.

  • Track 8-1Laser Distrect Sensors
  • Track 8-2Laser Displacement Sensors
  • Track 8-3Laser Proximity Sensors
  • Track 8-4Laser Triangular Sensors

Fiber lasers are fundamentally different from other laser types; in a fiber laser the active medium that generates the laser beam is actually dispersed within the fiber optic itself. This differentiates them from fiber-delivered lasers where the beam is simply transported from the laser resonator to the beam delivery optics. Fiber lasers are now widely accepted as being the most focusable (or highest brightness) of any laser type. Fiber lasers have consolidated their position at the high average power multi-kilowatt end of the industriallaser spectrum and it is clear that the limitations associated with fiber lasers earlier are now well understood, allowing the development of a wide range of lasers. The intrinsically scalable concept of fiber lasers has been used to scale multimode fiber lasers up to output powers greater than 50 kW and single mode fiber lasers up to 10kW in power.

  • Track 9-1Fiber Lasers
  • Track 9-2Fiber Optics Sensors
  • Track 9-3Fiber Optics
  • Track 9-4Fiber Optics communication
  • Track 9-5Fibre and Integrated optics
  • Track 9-6Ultrafast Fiber Lasers
  • Track 9-7Fiber Laser Technology
  • Track 9-8Fiber Laser Marking
  • Track 9-9Fiber Laser Cutting
  • Track 9-10Fiber & Waveguide Lasers

Lasers optics events are well established in many manufacturing technologies, for precision delivery of intense power for scribing, cutting welding, and for precise 2D and 3D metrology. The many thousands of less powerful - but precise - lasers cutting fabrics, making patterns in glass blocks, customizing trophies and so on, really show how the laser has moved from technical marvel to common tool. Lasers in hospitals, dermatological suites, dental surgeries and eye clinics benefit many, day in, day out. Estimates suggest that the world market for lasers in 2007 alone was worth more than £4Bn!. The total number of laser patents issued since its invention is well over 50,000. There are more than 75 institutes across the world doing research in the advances of Laser Technology.

  • Track 10-1Laser Optics physics
  • Track 10-2Laser Optics Systems
  • Track 10-3Laser Optics Technologies
  • Track 10-4Optical fibers
  • Track 10-5Applied Optics
  • Track 10-6Quantum optics
  • Track 10-7Ultrafast nonlinear optics
  • Track 10-8Optical Fiber sensors
  • Track 10-9Biomedical Optics
  • Track 10-10Optical polymers
  • Track 10-11Optical switching
  • Track 10-12Optical Networks
  • Track 10-13Fibre and Integrated optics
  • Track 10-14Optical Spectroscopy
  • Track 10-15Integrated optical devices
  • Track 10-16Theoretical Optical Physics
  • Track 10-17Ultrashort pulse processing
  • Track 10-18Optical Properties of Semiconductors
  • Track 10-19Laser Induced Photochemistry

laser conferences Technological advancements in laser technology have created a plethora of applications in the medical field, leading to significant rise in the number of procedures carried out using lasers. Smaller incisions, lesser pain and faster recovery times are some of the benefits laser technology offers. Currently, lasers are used in a wide range of applications in areas such as ophthalmology, oncology, cosmetic surgery, cardiology, dentistry, gynecology, dermatology, gastroenterology, diagnostics, and urology. Surgical lasers are especially expected to benefit from the increasing adoption of laser procedures in non-invasive applications such as hair removal and skin rejuvenation.

  • Track 11-1Laser applications in Medicine
  • Track 11-2Laser Applications in Industry
  • Track 11-3Laser Applications in Photonics
  • Track 11-4Applied Laser Technology

Photonics science includes the generation, emission, transmission, modulation, signal processing, switching, amplification, and detection/sensing of light. Though covering all light's technical applications over the whole spectrum, most photonic applications are in the range of visible and near-infrared light. Photonics can be seen as one of the major enabling technologies of the last decades, leading to new products and services with significant economic benefits. The huge diversity of products with photonic components demonstrates the positive impact to the rise in the growth of economy. No sector of business or industry remains untouched by photonics, the science of generating and harnessing light.

 

  • Track 12-1Photonic systems
  • Track 12-2Photonic integrated circuits
  • Track 12-3Application of Photonics
  • Track 12-4Non Linear Optics
  • Track 12-5Ultrafast Photonics
  • Track 12-6Quantum Photonics and Quantum Information
  • Track 12-7Quantum Simulation & Quantum Computing
  • Track 12-8Non Linear integrated photonics

The photonics industry, photonics symposiums in the world is very broad in scope with applications ranging from telecommunications fiber optic links to cancer treatments. Applications of photonics are ubiquitous. Included are all areas from everyday life to the most advanced science, e.g. light detection, telecommunications, information processing, lighting, metrology, spectroscopy, holography, medicine (surgery, vision correction, endoscopy, health monitoring), military technology, laser material processing, visual art, Biophotonics, agriculture, and robotics.

The potential economic impact of photonic technologies in the next ten years is considerable and a number of industrial organizations have predicted growth rates of up to 25% with total markets of hundreds of billions of dollars. One important aspect of the photonics component market is that it enables much larger, systems-level technologies. Businesses in the field of photonics and light-based technologies work on solving key societal challenges, such as energy generation and energy efficiency, healthy ageing of the population, climate change, and security. photonics meetings Photonic technologies have major impact on the world economy with a current global market of €300 billion and projected market value of over €600 billion in 2020. Growth in the photonics industry more than doubled that of the worldwide GDP (gross domestic product) between 2005 and 2011. Photonics impacts around 10% of the European economy. This leverage is generated by a European photonics market worth €58.5billion (21% of the world market) and a European photonics industry employing 290,000 people.

  • Track 13-1Optical fibre communications
  • Track 13-2Aviation
  • Track 13-3Construction
  • Track 13-4Military
  • Track 13-5Information processing
  • Track 13-6Metrology
  • Track 13-7Photonic computing
  • Track 13-8Applied Photonics

Nanotechnology, optoelectronics, and photonics are expected to make a significant impact on the way we see the world today. Nano photonics emerged from nanotechnology, photonics, and optoelectronics; the technology provides high thermal resistance, energy efficiency, and longer operational life. As a result, it has been gaining acceptance from companies, which is expected to drive the market. Increasing investment in end-use industries including consumer electronics, telecommunications, and solar power conversion systems is also expected to fuel market growth over the next few years. However, high research and development cost coupled with high cost of raw materials as well as equipment is expected to restrain the industry from realizing its full potential. In order the overcome this barrier, prices need to be lowered, and standardization needs to be established for filing patents. Biophotonics can also be described as the "development and application of optical techniques, particularly imaging, to the study of biological molecules, cells and tissue". One of the main benefits of using optical techniques which make up Biophotonics is that they preserve the integrity of the biological cells being examined. Many researchers across the world are doing massive research in the field of Biophotonics. The Nano photonics components market is expected to reach over $3.6 billion by 2014, while the Nano photonics device market is expected to grow at a CAGR of more than 100% from its current market size of $1.8 billion to $58 billion in 2016.

  • Track 14-1Micro and Nanophotonic devices
  • Track 14-2Environmental monitoring
  • Track 14-3Non-invasive imaging/diagnostic modalities
  • Track 14-4Photonic therapeutics and diagnostics
  • Track 14-5Biomedical optics, spectroscopy and Microscopy
  • Track 14-6Photonic acoustic tomography
  • Track 14-7Optical coherence tomography (OMT)
  • Track 14-8Laser tissue interaction
  • Track 14-9Recent advances in Nanophotonics & Biophotonics
  • Track 14-10Quantom dots
  • Track 14-11Photonic crystal devices
  • Track 14-12Elastomeric photonics
  • Track 14-13Plasmonic surfaces
  • Track 14-14Polymer opals
  • Track 14-15Micro cavities
  • Track 14-16Quantum Transport

Optical technologies optics conferences are expanding into literally all areas of modern life. Already, over 90 percent of all the data transferred for the telecommunication is transmitted by optical fiber.in microelectronics, storage media and microprocessors are produced using optical techniques. Medicine, too, is increasingly relying on optical technologies, for both diagnosis and therapy and in production engineering, laser techniques are systematically gaining ground in metrology and manufacturing. High productivity, flexibility and quality are the key advantages of laser technology, which makes its impact on all the fields. Most of the mainstream laser categories were developed five decades ago but the commercialization started with CO2 lasers being used in most of the industrial applications. The new lasers like femtosecond and disc lasers operate on the conventional principles, but compete with previous forms of lasers in output power and efficiency. In spite of being very technical in terms of installation and usage, lasers continue to be part of cutting edge high end devices across verticals.

  • Track 15-1Displays and holography
  • Track 15-2Advanced quantum and optoelectronic applications
  • Track 15-3Photonic integration
  • Track 15-4Optical communications
  • Track 15-5Semiconductor lasers and LEDs

lasers conferences Technological advancements in laser technology have created a plethora of applications in the medical field, leading to significant rise in the number of procedures carried out using lasers. Smaller incisions, lesser pain and faster recovery times are some of the benefits laser technology offers. Currently, lasers are used in a wide range of applications in areas such as ophthalmology, oncology, cosmetic surgery, cardiology, dentistry, gynecology, dermatology, gastroenterology, diagnostics, and urology. Surgical lasers are especially expected to benefit from the increasing adoption of laser procedures in non-invasive applications such as hair removal and skin rejuvenation.

As stated by the new market research report on Medical Laser Systems, the United States represents the largest market worldwide. Asia-Pacific is projected to emerge as the fastest growing market with a CAGR of 12.6% over the analysis period. Surgical Lasers represents the largest product segment in the global medical laser systems market. Lasers have been increasingly finding adoption in surgical procedures, largely due to the advantages offered. Surgical lasers have evolved from large and complicated equipment to hand held diode lasers and even smaller lasers made of fiber. These advanced lasers are finding new applications in medical fields such as hair removal and skin rejuvenation procedures. Growth in the global market is also expected to be spearheaded by Diagnostic Lasers.

  • Track 16-1Cancer treatment
  • Track 16-2Medical Imaging
  • Track 16-3Dentistry
  • Track 16-4Dermatology
  • Track 16-5Recent advances in Laser in medicine
  • Track 16-6Endovenous laser treatment

On the basis of application: The different processes pertaining to this market are segmented in terms of cutting, drilling, marking and engraving, micro-processing, and advanced processing. These processes are used in various applications for different verticals.

The global market of lasers in industry is expected to grow to $17.36 billion by 2020 from its 2013 market size of $ 11.24 billion, at an estimated CAGR of 6.18% between 2014 and 2020.

 

  • Track 17-1Laser cutting
  • Track 17-2Laser scribing
  • Track 17-3Laser welding
  • Track 17-4Laser drilling
  • Track 17-5Laser marking
  • Track 17-6Laser soldering
  • Track 17-7Laser printing
  • Track 17-8Recent advances in Laser in Industry

Laser soldering is a technique where a precisely focused laser beam provides controlled heating of the solder alloy leading to a fast and non-destructive of an electrical joint. The process uses a controlled laser beam to transfer energy to a soldering location where the absorbed energy heats the solder until it reaches its melting temperature leading to the soldering of the contact and this completely eliminates any mechanical contact

  • Track 18-1Laser Soldering Methods
  • Track 18-2Diode Laser Soldering
  • Track 18-3Smart Fiber Coupled Diode Laser
  • Track 18-4Laser Selective Soldering
  • Track 18-5Laser Soldering System
  • Track 18-6Laser Melting

Laser safety is EVERYONE'S concern! A laser is as safe or as hazardous as the user–and that user's knowledge and skill, defines how well laser safety is managed.

Many institutes across the world offer Laser safety manuals and protocols to all the professionals dealing with laser in various fields.

  • Track 19-1Track the problem of aircraft illumination
  • Track 19-2Laser safety during service
  • Track 19-3Laser safety training (Performance based learning)
  • Track 19-4Laser safety at highly visible projects
  • Track 19-5Update on Laser ANSI Standards
  • Track 19-6YSHA Laser Safety
  • Track 19-7ANSI Laser Safety
  • Track 19-8Euro Laser Safety
  • Track 20-1Nano lasers
  • Track 20-2Nanowire Lasers
  • Track 20-3Applications of Nano Lasers